Valuable energy

[b]Belarus continues to strengthen its own energy security[/b]Signing a contract with a Russian enterprise in September, to build first stage of nuclear power plant. New legislation has been passed to govern our electricity supply, which is seen as the first important step in the reformation of the Belarusian energy sector. From January 1st, 2012, private companies, generating electricity from renewable resources, will have received access to the country’s energy supply system. In October, President Alexander Lukashenko agreed to sign a contract with Russia to construct a nuclear power plant in Grodno Region’s Ostrovets.
Belarus continues to strengthen its own energy security
Signing a contract with a Russian enterprise in September, to build first stage of nuclear power plant. New legislation has been passed to govern our electricity supply, which is seen as the first important step in the reformation of the Belarusian energy sector. From January 1st, 2012, private companies, generating electricity from renewable resources, will have received access to the country’s energy supply system.
In October, President Alexander Lukashenko agreed to sign a contract with Russia to construct a nuclear power plant in Grodno Region’s Ostrovets. Russian Atomstroyexport is to work with the Belarusian Nuclear Power Plant Construction Directorate. The document outlines terms for building two reactors of a nuclear power plant, boasting a total capacity of 2,400MW, with the first block coming into operation in 2017 and the second in 2018. The NPP-2006 design, by St. Petersburg’s Atomenergoproekt, has been chosen.
The Russian contractor is to take complete responsibility for the construction, explains Anatoly Andrianov, the Director of Construction Management at the Belarusian Nuclear Power Plant. He tells us that foundations for the construction of the first block are being laid in spring 2012, with first sites being put into exploitation in June. “This primarily tackles the concrete and mortar facilities. Administrative buildings will be also constructed to house engineering-technical staff,” asserts the Dirctor.
Belarusian specialists were working on the site in October, constructing an administrative building and warehouses. Meanwhile, according to Mr. Andrianov, the planning of two venues has been already completed: manufacturing facilities and the territory, where the NPP will be directly located. Mr. Andrianov explains that ‘a decision has been adopted to finance 80 percent of construction with a Russian loan and 20 percent from Belarusian funds’. The Russian loan totals $9bn, including $3bn for the construction of infrastructure, as announced by Russia’s Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, during his visit to Minsk.
Of course, the IAEA will be monitoring work at all stages, ready to assist Belarus in ensuring safety at the nuclear power plant. Yukiya Amano, the IAEA Director General, tells us, “The IAEA does not interfere in any country’s decision to use nuclear power or construct a reactor, since this should be adopted by the sovereign state itself, without external interference. This would be the decision of the Belarusian Government. However, where the decision is made, the IAEA is ready to advise on safety, to ensure the power station is as stable as possible.”
In 2012, other vital changes are to take place in Belarus’ energy sector besides the building of the nuclear power station. Private businesses are to be allowed to sell electricity to the national grid for the first time, as envisaged by new state legislation.
At present, only enterprises subject to the Energy Ministry can supply electricity. Where electricity is generated by other ministries or communal facilities, Belenergo (the state energy supplier) purchases it in line with set tariffs, selling it on to final consumers.
In 2012, the rules will change and, from January 1st, any organisation, regardless of its form of ownership, will be able to supply electricity. Belenergo explains that private companies generating electricity from renewable resources will receive access to the country’s energy supply system, stimulating development of wind power and production of energy from biomass.
Belenergo specialists add that this should initiate an open market for electricity in the Republic. It is the first step in reforming the Belarusian energy system, enhancing its competitiveness, its transparency and its stability.

By Vladimir Velichanskiy
Заметили ошибку? Пожалуйста, выделите её и нажмите Ctrl+Enter
Версия для печати
Заполните форму или Авторизуйтесь
 
*
 
 
 
*
 
Написать сообщение …Загрузить файлы?
Новости
Все новости