Symbols of time

September is, undoubtedly, a month when our thirst for knowledge reaches its culmination. Schoolchildren and students head for the classroom on the first autumn day, commencing their next steps on the journey of learning. Without study, how would young people achieve their career goals? Belarus occupies a leading place in Europe and worldwide for its level of university training — a praiseworthy tradition formed dozens of years ago. We can be proud that it hasn’t lost its power.Educational processes natural evolve — both in universities and schools; today, technology has a strong role to play. Who can imagine a student without their laptop? Now, junior school pupils are receiving computer literacy classes and the usual textbooks are being replaced by electronic display boards. The experiment seems interesting, although it’s still too early to decide on its success. Time will tell.
September is, undoubtedly, a month when our thirst for knowledge reaches its culmination. Schoolchildren and students head for the classroom on the first autumn day, commencing their next steps on the journey of learning. Without study, how would young people achieve their career goals? Belarus occupies a leading place in Europe and worldwide for its level of university training — a praiseworthy tradition formed dozens of years ago. We can be proud that it hasn’t lost its power.
Educational processes natural evolve — both in universities and schools; today, technology has a strong role to play. Who can imagine a student without their laptop? Now, junior school pupils are receiving computer literacy classes and the usual textbooks are being replaced by electronic display boards. The experiment seems interesting, although it’s still too early to decide on its success. Time will tell.
Despite innovations guiding the educational process, respect for the printed word remains, as celebrated by the Day of Belarusian Written Language in September. This year, the holiday was hosted by Brest Region’s Gantsevichi, with the whole town working to make the event memorable. It honoured the most famous Belarusian writer, Yakub Kolas, who taught in a village near Gantsevichi for almost two years (from October 1902 to August 1904). At that time, he was aged just 20 and we can hardly suppose that he imagined that his statue would appear in Gantsevichi ‘in bronze’ a century later. Opening the Avenue of Written Language, where the monument to Kolas was unveiled, Pavel Latushko, Belarus’ Culture Minister, noted, “Belarusians can be justifiably proud of their historical and cultural legacy and their printed word.” The bronze plaques of writers, born in Gantsevichi District and installed at the Avenue, confirm his statement.
Written language and literature are surely inseparable notions, since language acquires elevation through artistic works. Words are processed like diamonds by poets and prose writers. Throughout Gantsevichi, books were seen everywhere, being bought avidly by the crowds. In Searching of the Lost and Caring for the Future, we can read about the Day of Belarusian Written Language and how it promotes the revival of cities and towns. The holiday in Gantsevichi may be over but its spiritual traces continue to echo.
Trade is no less important than spiritual self-assertion, forming the basis of our material well-being. Since September, Belarus has been using the market exchange rate of its Belarusian rouble: the first step of the anti-crisis strategy, prepared by the Government and the National Bank and praised by experts. Stabilisation of the currency market should help businesses, investors and the population look ahead, while bringing clarity to the economy. Announcing the new strategy, President Alexander Lukashenko noted that it is based exclusively on objective market laws. However, Belarus is facing a difficult path ahead to revitalise its economic system.
Of course, Belarus is not alone in facing such a situation; many states have been obliged to solve similar problems, with anti-crisis recipes already elaborated. The stabilisation of the currency market and achieving of a single rouble exchange rate are the foremost tasks in such cases, enabling businesses, investors and residents to orient their plans for the future. Read more in Anti-crisis Strategy.
This year sees the 20th anniversary of the formation of the CIS, which has a history as complex as that of its member states. No one believes that it has yet run its course; however, various projects aiming at consolidation are being discussed. The CIS Summit, hosted by Dushanbe in early September, demonstrated that the eleven member countries are keen to strengthen their partnership. Twenty Years On underlines that Belarus has always been and will remain an active supporter of integration within the CIS. The Union is also dedicated to integration, particularly referring to Russia and Belarus, looking at the key facts of integration interaction.
Time Brings Countries Closer details today’s opportunities in the Persian Gulf, covering relations between Belarus and Qatar — one of the most influential states in the region.
Meanwhile, September always marks the beginning of a new cultural season, with theatres announcing their premieres. Our Season of Discoveries is dedicated to the current theatrical and concert season.
Alexander Anisimov, Chief Conductor of the State Academic Symphony Orchestra of Belarus, who was recently awarded the title of People’s Artiste of Belarus, has many delights planned for the new season, as he tells us in Major Notes in the Score of Life. His conductor’s baton, made by a Belarusian master from Mogilev, travels with him far and wide, at home and abroad, making an excellent symbol of Belarusian culture.

VIKTOR KHARKOV,
editor of magazine
“Беларусь. Belarus”
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