Seeing is believing

[b]Mysteries of dungeons where White Lady hides[/b]‘Have you seen the ghost?’ friends and relatives will ask on your return from Golshany. Who is the White Lady from the Franciscan monastery?They say that she was the most beautiful lady in the district and was married to a builder. However, she befell an unfortunate fate. Her husband was laying bricks at the monastery and his team was having terrible problems; every wall they built fell over. Eventually, they decided that whoever’s wife was the first to bring some food would be walled up alive as an offering to bring better luck to their work. The poor woman was doomed to gasp her last breath behind the brickwork, forever entombed, and the workmen somehow found success to complete their project. Now, her unhappy spirit torments anyone who sleeps in the monastery.
Mysteries of dungeons where White Lady hides

‘Have you seen the ghost?’ friends and relatives will ask on your return from Golshany. Who is the White Lady from the Franciscan monastery?
They say that she was the most beautiful lady in the district and was married to a builder. However, she befell an unfortunate fate. Her husband was laying bricks at the monastery and his team was having terrible problems; every wall they built fell over. Eventually, they decided that whoever’s wife was the first to bring some food would be walled up alive as an offering to bring better luck to their work. The poor woman was doomed to gasp her last breath behind the brickwork, forever entombed, and the workmen somehow found success to complete their project. Now, her unhappy spirit torments anyone who sleeps in the monastery. Memorable site was mounted to Sophia Golshanskaya in Ashmyany
The legend of the walled up girl isn’t found in any documents, although this building has existed since the early 17th century. It is unusual that there are no references to these strange events. Of course, many are keen to find out more about the legend. Groups of ‘ghost-hunters’ have visited the monastery several times, with their gauges sometimes reading off the scale in particular spots. Dosimeters have detected excess radiation levels, while gas detectors haven’t revealed anything unusual — despite expectations.
Interestingly, a niche filled with human bones has been found in the monastery’s basement. At first sight, it could prove the legend. However, additional research shows that there are plenty of skeletons on the premises, since the first Roman Christians walled up the dead in catacombs. Monks and nuns were often buried in those places where they had served. However, the legend lives on. A split has been discovered in the monastery’s wall and all attempts to cement it have failed. Local people are certain that this is a spot associated with the White Lady.
Of course, legends continue to grow. Some say that, on silent moonlit nights, millstones grind flour at the old mill, horses neigh, carts squawk and the ghost of a miller is heard speaking to the ghost of farmhand…
Personal record.Wise Sophia. 
Noblewoman Sophia Golshanskaya was just 17 when she agreed to marry Polish King Jagiello, who was in his declining years. Her life was connected with three countries, since her father, Andrey, was from the Lithuanian Golshankys and her mother, Alexandra, was from the Belarusian Drutskys. When Jagiello asked Sophia to marry him, she was young enough to be his granddaughter but her ambition was sufficient to convince her to accept. On March 22nd 1422, they wed in Novogrudok; the chapel remains today.
Sophia, the King’s fourth wife, wasn’t welcomed warmly in Poland. Historian Lyubov Soboleva tells us that chronicler Jan Dlugosh wrote that the Belarusian girl was beautiful, but lacked godliness. When Sophia fell pregnant with a second baby, scandal broke out that she had been having an affair. “Gossips at Wawel Castle said that Queen Sophia had been secretly flirting with the knights,” notes Ms. Soboleva. “Sophia was watched carefully for evidence of infidelity for a year. She swore that she hadn’t been untrue to the King but relations between them were spoilt.”
Soon, the rumours became so prominent that the King’s enemies began to persuade him that he was too old to have fathered children. The Queen’s ladies-in-waiting were sent to prison and tortured to incriminate Sophie, naming knight Genryk as her imaginary lover. He was arrested but would only repeat, as a prayer, “The Queen wasn’t untrue to the King.”
It may seem strange but, even in those severe times, the court could be humane. Lawyers recollected that Jagiello had always been jealous, suspecting his previous wives, Jadwiga and Anna, of betrayal. Sophia took an oath on the Bible to say she was innocent. Many years later, it became clear that her sons and their father were as alike as two peas. The descendants of the Polish King and the Belarusian Duchess were Jagiellons. Sophia died in 1461 and was buried in Krakow Cathedral.
Заметили ошибку? Пожалуйста, выделите её и нажмите Ctrl+Enter
Версия для печати
Заполните форму или Авторизуйтесь
 
*
 
 
 
*
 
Написать сообщение …Загрузить файлы?