Major holiday

[b]Belarus solemnly celebrates Independence Day on July 3rd[/b]July 3rd marks the main holiday of Belarusian statehood. Announced in 1996, it represents our country’s national revival. Following public wishes — voiced in a nationwide referendum — the holiday is celebrated on the day when Minsk was liberated from the Nazi invaders, in July 1944.In June 1941, Belarus was the first Soviet state to experience the force of Hitler’s army. On the second day of the war, Minsk was fiercely bombarded and, during those years of the Great Patriotic War, our country lost every third citizen. However, team spirit, mutual support, ardent patriotism and fidelity to the Motherland — natural for Belarusians — created a barrier against which the enemy’s troops finally crashed.
Belarus solemnly celebrates Independence Day on July 3rd

July 3rd marks the main holiday of Belarusian statehood. Announced in 1996, it represents our country’s national revival. Following public wishes — voiced in a nationwide referendum — the holiday is celebrated on the day when Minsk was liberated from the Nazi invaders, in July 1944.
In June 1941, Belarus was the first Soviet state to experience the force of Hitler’s army. On the second day of the war, Minsk was fiercely bombarded and, during those years of the Great Patriotic War, our country lost every third citizen. However, team spirit, mutual support, ardent patriotism and fidelity to the Motherland — natural for Belarusians — created a barrier against which the enemy’s troops finally crashed.
On the eve of the Independence Day celebrations, Minsk hosted a solemn ceremony to bury the remains of unknown soldiers in the crypt of All Saints’ Church. The event gathered thousands of Minskers and guests to the capital, who had come to pay tribute to the defender-soldiers. In the niches of the crypt wall, the remains of the unknown soldiers were discovered by a special squad from the Ministry of Defense during search expeditions. These comprise the remains of an unknown soldier killed during the Patriotic War of 1812 (in a battle against the French), the remains of a soldier killed in August 1915 (during the First World War, near Grodno as the Russian army resisted a German advance) and the remains of an unknown soldier from the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 (who fell in November 1943 after Soviet troops were forced to cross the River Dnieper).
On paying tribute, President of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko noted, “Belarusian people have never surrendered to their enemies. We are ready today to face the toughest ordeals for the sake of independence and the right to live freely on this land.”
The construction of All Saints’ Church is being supported by personal donations from the Belarusian President, alongside funds from the state budget.
Celebrating Independence Day pays tribute to the heroism and endurance of Minskers, the self-sacrificing struggle of Minsk’s partisan fighters and the unprecedented labours of those who restored the country from the ashes. They built factories, manufactured the first products at local enterprises, and set up schools once more.
The solemn parade in Minsk — marching from Oktyabrskaya Square to Pobedy Square — gathered several thousand people, including veterans and youngsters. Alexander Lukashenko laid flowers at the Pobedy (Victory) Monument and wreaths and bouquets were laid by Belarus’ political and public associations, those from various religious confessions and foreign diplomats. A gala-concert entitled Belarus Is Us! was organised in front of the Minsk Hero-City Stella, with the traditional ‘Singing the Hymn Together’ part of the festive celebrations.
The President of Belarus received congratulations on the Independence Day from heads of state, public and political figures from CIS and non-CIS counties — including the leaders of Azerbaijan, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, China, Venezuela, South Korea, Greece, Bulgaria, Indonesia, Cuba, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Vietnam, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Libya and many other countries.
Modern life in Belarus fulfils the dreams of those who defended their homeland during the Great Patriotic War, notes war veteran Valentina Baranova, from Grodno. She believes that liberation from German occupation has enabled Belarusians to live as they do today — peacefully and happily.
Заметили ошибку? Пожалуйста, выделите её и нажмите Ctrl+Enter
Версия для печати
Заполните форму или Авторизуйтесь
 
*
 
 
 
*
 
Написать сообщение …Загрузить файлы?
Новости
Все новости