Everything going to plan in Ostrovets

Work goes with a swing in Ostrovets. The construction of the nuclear power station is meeting the schedule; no financial problems are occurring and builders are doing their job efficiently. Our Belarusian specialists oversee almost 90 percent of all works on the site and, accordingly, control the major share of all allocated funds. Really, such serious orders envisage worthy salaries. Recently, Rosatom’s Director General, Sergey Kirienko, visited Minsk to clear up some working issues
By Dmitry Kryat

Mr. Kirienko met the President to discuss the matter and Alexander Lukashenko began their meeting, saying, “I proceed from the fact that we’ve borrowed this money from Russia, around $10bn, which covers the station’s cost. We’ve found a contractor to build the station but, due to certain discrepancies, or probably laws or some mismatch, questions have arisen. Being assiduous hosts, we must strongly hold the money in our hands, choosing the cheapest solution, without harming quality and safety. This is probably the key which I must control as the President.”

Our Russian partners share this view and Mr. Kirienko asserted, “We realise the degree of our responsibility. We must build the safest station at a reasonable price, without, in any way, affecting its quality and reliability. Moreover, it must be built in the shortest possible time and attract as many Belarusian enterprises and constructors as possible. I confirm all these obligations. We are moving along this path and, generally speaking, I consider the situation on the site is fine.”

Mr. Kirienko informed the President that his Corporation would use this project of a Belarusian nuclear power station to build similar plants for foreign customers. “This design is of the most modern generation (3+) which ensures the post-Fukushima safety requirements. If such an edifice was used on the day of the Fukushima disaster, no consequences of that kind would have occurred. The station would have stopped its operation but ensured safety. No disaster would have happened, as no radiation would have been emitted,” he added.

According to Mr. Kirienko, Rosatom has now been contracted for the construction of 22 new power stations worldwide, with the latest agreements being signed with Hungary, Finland and Jordan. Each project costs at least $5bn, creating a total sum of over $110bn. Interestingly, Belarusian specialists are supposed to participate in the realisation of these projects. After the accumulation of knowledge and experience at their own station, they’ll be able to sell these skills to foreign clients. Speaking of Belarusian specialists, Mr. Kirienko stressed, “We should admit that the Belarusian organisations, which take part in the project, boast an extremely high level of qualification, discipline and conscientious attitude to their work.”

Mr. Lukashenko responded, “If we learn to build nuclear power stations, then we are ready to accompany you in building similar facilities all over the world, following your technologies.” Rosatom’s Head loved the idea, noting, “Really, you are right. We are ready to invite the most qualified organisations, which demonstrate the best efficiency, to join us in our work, both in Russia and elsewhere.”

Meanwhile, work at the Belarusian nuclear power station site is gaining momentum and, this year, 8bn Russian Roubles worth of construction jobs are supposed to be complete which is almost double that achieved in 2013. Belarusian organisations would receive around 80 percent of the sum, with the remaining funds overseen by Russian firms. 
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